International Association of Peer Supporters 2016 National Conference

The growing number of peer specialists working effectively in mental health systems around the country has led to a rapid expansion of the roles and responsibilities of this new element in the mental health workforce.  In August, the Temple Collaborative and its consumer consultants collaborated with the International Association of Peer Supporters National Conference here in Philadelphia to offer a pre-conference workshop – available both in- person and on-line – that explored three emerging roles for peer specialists:  promoting connections to religious congregations, encouraging service recipients to return to competitive employment, and preparing peers for jobs in the crisis intervention field.

After an introduction from the Collaborative’s Richard Baron that outlined the importance of these three aspects of community life to individuals with mental illness, the workshop/webinar participants heard from:  Christa Andrade, who spoke about the roles that peer specialists can play in helping those who are interested in religious or spiritual connections to participate in the congregations of their choice (Developing Welcoming Faith Communities);  Jim Klasen, who brought participants up-to-date on the ‘advanced peer specialist’ 2-day program that offers peers the skills needed to assist those they serve to return to competitive employment (please email Jim directly at jklasen@mhasp.org for more information); and David Measel, who spoke about his work with the Pennsylvania Peer Support Coalition to develop a comprehensive three-day training program for peers who want jobs in crisis intervention systems (e.g., hot-lines, crisis residential settings, or mobile crisis teams (Voices: Perspectives of Peer Specialists Working in Crisis Intervention Services). A recording of the INAPS pre-conference workshop on the expanding roles of peer specialists in its entirety can be found here.

In another contribution to the iNAPS conference,  Dr. Mark Salzer and Dr. Liz Thomas represented the Collaborative during a workshop that they gave at the INAPS annual conference, held in Philadelphia last month. Mark presented on the current state of the peer support research literature, and Liz facilitated a discussion about audience members’ perceptions of the most important research questions for the field. Attendees were highly engaged, generating a list of about 30 questions with topics ranging from the effectiveness of different types of peer support and the contexts that facilitate effectiveness to characteristics of the researchers and how the research is currently being used. A Center product with a list of these questions is forthcoming.

Posted in Community Inclusion

New Webinar! Supporting College Students with Psychiatric Disabilities

webinar-flyer-screengrab

Disability Services Offices around the country frequently are looking for new ideas and approaches to supporting students, especially students with psychiatric disabilities. The Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion (www.tucollaborative.org) is a national leader in this area and is available to provide training and technical assistance. The Center also is engaged in cutting edge research involving college students with psychiatric disabilities.
In this FREE one-hour webinar, Drs. Mark Salzer and Amber O’Shea from the Temple University collaborative will:
1.Provide an overview of the experiences of college students with significant mental health issues
2.Discuss supports that these students find to be most helpful
3.Review factors that promote students’ use of disability support services
4.Describe barriers to students’ use of disability support services

To register for the webinar click here

Posted in Community Inclusion

New Document! Let’s Move: Using the Community to Increase Physical Activity An 8-Week Protocol

Let’s Move: Using the Community to Increase Physical Activity An 8-Week Protocol

During the Spring 2016 school semester, two Recreation Therapy Interns worked with The Temple University Collaborative to develop and facilitate programming aimed at increasing community participation for consumers of local mental health agencies. Each intern developed an 8-week protocol with a focus on encouraging participation in community-based recreation. Interns were encouraged to create group sessions that would work either as stand-alone sessions or as 8 consecutive weekly sessions. This project was done under the supervision of a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist (CTRS) at the Collaborative and staff at the sites where the sessions were delivered.

Developed by our Recreation Therapy intern and facilitated at two Community-Integrated Recovery Centers (CIRC), this 8-week series encourages participants to increase physical activity levels. Sessions incorporated music, dance and movement activities along with discussions about the benefits of physical activity and strategies to use the community to be more physically active; one program served consumers with mental health diagnoses and the second served consumers with mental health diagnoses and histories of addiction. Most participants attended the entirety of the weekly sessions. In the final session, participants were quizzed on what they had learned. Participants reported attending community activities they learned about during the group sessions and identified the value of physical activity.

Posted in Community Inclusion

New Document! Adding Recreation to your Coping Toolbox: An 8-Week Protocol

Adding Recreation to your Coping Toolbox: An 8-Week Protocol

During the Spring 2016 school semester, two Recreation Therapy Interns worked with The Temple University Collaborative to develop and facilitate programming aimed at increasing community participation for consumers of local mental health agencies. Each intern developed an 8-week protocol with a focus on encouraging participation in community-based recreation. Interns were encouraged to create group sessions that would work either as stand-alone sessions or as 8 consecutive weekly sessions. This project was done under the supervision of a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist (CTRS) at the Collaborative and staff at the sites where the sessions were delivered.

Adding Recreation to your Coping Toolbox: An 8-Week Protocol series encourages participants to identify personal coping strategies and community-based resources needed to engage. This protocol was designed to support consumers to identify coping strategies that minimize stress and conflict after discharge from a short-stay, inpatient facility.

Posted in Community Inclusion

New Document! Peer Facilitated Community Inclusion Tool Kit

Peer Facilitated Community Inclusion Tool Kit

Peers can play a critically important and unique role in supporting increased community participation among individuals with serious mental illness. Our toolkit is an excellent resource to help peers explore goals for increasing community participation with the consumers they work with. This toolkit includes various exercises and worksheets that peers can use to help individuals reflect on desired levels of community participation, explore existing supports and resources, and develop community participation goals. Special thanks to Matthew Federici, MS, CPRP, Executive Director of the Copeland Center for Wellness and Recovery, for his editorial contribution and support for this document. For more information on our partnership with the Copeland Center, please visit their website here.

Posted in Community Inclusion

New Document! Physical Activity Fair Manual

Physical Activity Fair Manual

This handbook is the outcome of a Physical Activity Fair that was hosted in Philadelphia, and the lessons learned about hosting this type of event. The mission of our Physical Activity Fair was to connect people with serious mental illnesses to sustainable resources for physical activity, who have a life expectancy that is up to 30 years less than the general population often due to modifiable behaviors.

While this handbook is designed to assist you as you plan to organize a Physical Activity Fair, it is assumed that many events rely on similar structure and planning, therefore this handbook might serve as a helpful resource as you plan other types of events that promote community inclusion as well.

Posted in Community Inclusion, Recreation and Leisure

New Document on Hosting Activity Fairs!

Hosting Activity Fairs: Our Experience
In Fall 2015 and Spring 2016, the Collaborative hosted two wellness fairs focused on encouraging community based recreation. These fairs aimed to: 1) introduce Philadelphians to free and low cost activities they could do in their city, and 2) encourage local businesses and organizations to consider ways they could become more welcoming of this population. This short document summarizes our experiences with hosting these fairs. Additionally, we developed a handbook to help others to run a similar event. You can find this handbook here. While this handbook is designed to assist you as you plan to organize a Physical Activity Community Access Fair, it is assumed that many events rely on similar structure and planning, therefore this handbook might serve as a helpful resource as you plan other types of events that promote community inclusion as well.
Posted in Community Inclusion, Recreation and Leisure

Collaboration with Wellways Australia

In Spring 2016, The Temple Collaborative spent a week in Australia bringing one of that nation’s major community mental health providers – Wellways – up-to-date on the emerging research findings and best practices models to promote community inclusion for individuals with mental health conditions. To inform its ongoing initiative to transform services in Melbourne, Tasmania, and Canberra into a ‘next generation’ provider and advocacy organization, Wellways funded the Collaborative to develop agency-specific products and trainings. These trainings and products offered a current look at the fundamental principles of community inclusion and implementation strategies that help make engagement in community life a reality for those living with mental health conditions.

The Temple Collaborative’s Director, Mark Salzer, and Knowledge Translation Director, Richard Baron, prepared a 120 page overview of: a) the definitions of community inclusion and documented justifications for making community inclusion a priority service development focus; b) the theoretical justifications for promoting community inclusion for individuals with disabilities; c) eleven core principles of community inclusion policies, programs, and practices and their research origins; and d) and a multi-sided view of community inclusion from consumer and family, clinical and rehabilitation, and community perspectives.

Dr. Salzer and Mr. Baron then joined Wellways consumers, executives, staff, board, and community members for a week in May 2016, for a series of public discussions and plenary presentations, and small change-oriented training programs in Melbourne, Tasmania, and the national capitol of Canberra. Wellway’s response was enthusiastic – at both executive and direct service levels – and planning initiatives are now underway both to broaden the commitment of the agency to community inclusion outcomes and to engage and support individuals and organizations that can help to establish ‘welcoming communities’ throughout the region.

 

 

Posted in Community Inclusion, Conference

Documents on Community Inclusion Policy Development

We have two new documents that focus on assisting behavioral managed care companies and their county/state partners in mental health service delivery to promote community inclusion policies, programs, and practices for individuals with mental health conditions.

Read more ›

Posted in Community Inclusion

New document on hosting a physical activity fair!

Physical Activity Fair Manual

This handbook is the outcome of a Physical Activity Fair that was hosted in Philadelphia, and the lessons learned about hosting this type of event. The mission of our Physical Activity Fair was to connect people with serious mental illnesses to sustainable resources for physical activity, who have a life expectancy that is up to 30 years less than the general population often due to modifiable behaviors.

While this handbook is designed to assist you as you plan to organize a Physical Activity Fair, it is assumed that many events rely on similar structure and planning, therefore this handbook might serve as a helpful resource as you plan other types of events that promote community inclusion as well.

Posted in Recreation and Leisure

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