Citizenship

Examples of the roles that service recipients can play in fulfilling civic responsibilities, including voting rights and responsibilities, policy and program advocacy, and volunteering are in this section.  These are all ways for service recipients to interact with community members.

Mental Disability and Voting Access

Dr. Mark Salzer, Ph.D., Director of the Temple University Collaborative, was interviewed on November 4, 2008 on public radio (WHYY/Philadelphia) for a discussion on voting access for those with psychiatric disabilities and strategies to assure greater voter participation. Listen to the interview here:

INTERVIEW

A Guide to the Voting Rights of People with Disabilities

For information on how best to address the barriers that still exist to the voting rights of individuals with psychiatric disabilities, download this Guide, developed collaboratively by the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law and the national Disability Rights Network, with financial support from the Temple University Collaborative.

 

 

Voting: Exercising the Right to Vote

This document is designed to answer the most frequently asked questions about voters’ rights for individuals with psychiatric disabilities, but includes additional information about how both individuals and groups can challenge discriminatory voting rights laws and practices through concerted advocacy that promotes broader civic engagement by those with psychiatric disabilities.

 

 

Civic Engagement: How to Get Involved in Your Community

This resource from the Temple University Collaborative discusses the benefits of getting involved in community activities, and offers many suggestions and strategies to promote active participation in the local social, political, religious, and mental health advocacy activities that can foster both empowerment and a sense of personal purpose.

Infographics

A link to a graphic on civic engagement

Guide to Civic Engagement

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